Not Sure Where to Apply?

Code Fellows

Courses: Code 101: Explore Software Development, Code 102: Intro to Software Development - Daytime, Code 102: Intro to Software Development - Nights & Weekends, Code 102: Intro to Software Development - Self-Paced, Code 201: Foundations of Software Development - Daytime, Code 201: Foundations of Software Development - Nights & Weekends, Code 301: Intermediate Software Development - Daytime, +16 more.
Code 301: Intermediate Software Development - Nights & Weekends, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in ASP.NET Core, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Full-Stack JavaScript - Daytime, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Full-Stack JavaScript - Nights & Weekends, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Java with SpringMVC & Android, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python - Daytime, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python - Nights & Weekends, Code 501: Intro to Data Structures & Algorithms, Code 501: Introduction to Data Analysis & Visualization with Python, Ops 101: Explore Cybersecurity, Ops 102: Intro to Computer Operations - Daytime, Ops 102: Intro to Computer Operations - Nights & Weekends, Ops 102: Intro to Computer Operations - Self-Paced, Ops 201: Foundations of Computer Operations, Ops 301: Networking and Systems Administration, Ops 401: Cybersecurity Engineering

Locations

Online, Seattle

About Code Fellows

Code Fellows offers full and part-time software development, ops and cybersecurity courses online and in-person from their Seattle, Washington location. Since their first cohort in 2013, Code Fellows has taught over 1400 graduates and iterated on their... Read More

The modular style of the Code Fellows program allows students to test into the course level that is most appropriate for their current skill level. In addition, the modular class structure allows students to choose the schedule and timing that meets their needs. Technologists with some experience can test into intermediate or advanced-level courses, while beginners can build their experience from the ground up, starting with an introductory course. Code Fellows also offers courses that run nights and weekends, both in-person or online to accommodate students who plan to continue working while going to school.

Code Fellows’ has several options at the advanced 400 level that run 10-weeks for full-time courses and 20 weeks for part-time courses. These include a Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Full-Stack JavaScript, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in ASP.NET Core, Code 401: Advanced Software Development for Mobile Applications, Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Java with SpringMVC & Android, and Ops 401: Cybersecurity Engineering.

Whether Black American, Native American, Hispanic American, career changer, recent college graduate, woman, code school student looking to join a better program, military veteran, or are unemployed or underemployed, Code Fellows wants to help these individuals find a rewarding new career in tech. They are committed to breaking down systemic barriers and ensuring all people are treated with respect and dignity. Through The Scholarship Fund, individuals that come from these backgrounds are able to apply for scholarships that cover up to 70 percent of tuition. In addition, one full-ride scholarship is granted to a Black American in every cohort.

Do you represent this school? Suggest edits.

Courses

Ops 201: Foundations of Computer Operations

  • Cost: $5,000
  • Duration: 4 weeks
Locations: Online, Seattle
Course Description:

Learn to support technology operations by resolving issues with hardware, software, and virtual or cloud systems.

In this hands-on course, you will deploy and troubleshoot Windows and Linux operating systems in various virtual and cloud environments. Key skills such as customer service, knowledge and process documentation, system shell proficiency, performance monitoring, system process management, issue handling, backup/imaging/recovery tools, and software application installation, maintenance, and removal will be practiced.

The course focuses on practical systems support and troubleshooting. Students will utilize issue tracking systems and the ITIL service management framework to communicate, resolve, and document issues and incidents. Students will also study how endpoints interact with the greater IT infrastructure, exploring concepts such as network protocols, Wi-Fi, and server-based user identity support.

This course includes a career coaching curriculum to get you ready for your job search. The course totals 160 hours, including lectures, lab, coworking, and collaborative projects.

Ops 301: Networking and Systems Administration

  • Cost: $5,000
  • Duration: 4 weeks
Locations: Online, Seattle
Course Description:

Gain hands-on Systems Administrator skills in this exciting course that follows the journey of the fictional Globex Corporation as it grows from a startup to a multinational enterprise with fully-functional network and information systems. As their new corporate systems administrator, get ready to upgrade obsolete systems and design new networks in this fast-paced learning environment that mirrors critical on-the-job scenarios designed to prepare you for real-world Ops challenges.

The course integrates practical network and systems administration operations such as network design and troubleshooting, server deployment and configuration, user identity management, scripting & automation, and system health monitoring with professional exercises in change management and project planning in a simulated on-the-job narrative.

This course includes a career coaching curriculum to get you ready for your job search. The course totals 160 hours, including lectures, lab, coworking, and collaborative projects.

Ops 401: Cybersecurity Engineering

  • Cost: $12,000
  • Duration: 10 weeks
Locations: Online, Seattle
Course Description:

Ready to kickstart your exciting career in cyber ops? In this intensive course, delve into critical cyber processes like risk assessment, data encryption, network security, threat modeling, code analysis, vulnerability scanning, and incident response. Gain valuable ethical hacker skills in penetration testing, and show off your awesome new abilities in two resume-enhancing projects!

Designed to prepare you for today’s most in-demand security skills, this hands-on course emphasizes practical cyber operations including both offensive and defensive roles. Students will gain cutting-edge cyber ops skills by analyzing and exploiting systems vulnerabilities, implementing defenses against common threats, and using cyber toolkits such as Kali Linux and Metasploit. Vulnerability scanning tools such as Nessus are utilized, as well as security monitoring tools such as Splunk.

This course includes a career coaching curriculum to get you ready for your job search, plus job search assistance after graduation. The course totals 400 hours, including lectures, lab, coworking, and collaborative projects.

Code Fellows Reviews

Average Ratings (All Programs)

Overall
Curriculum
Job Support

4.83/5

(135 reviews)
    2/26/2020
  • Karina Chen
  • Graduated: 2019

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Life-Changing Experience!"

Before I decided to take courses at Code Fellows, I read so many reviews about each bootcamp. Finally I chose Code Fellows and I started my first course in August 2019. I just recently graduated with a certificate in ASP.NET Core C# in December 2019.... Read More

Comment
    2/24/2020
  • Joe D Pennock II
  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Code 102 was the beginning of a life changing experience."

I have never had a background in tech. I worked construction, moved on to an aerospace machinist role, and most recently got my CDL and drove truck. I would always tell myself that I would get a "real" job when I figured out what I wanted to do. 14 years... Read More

Again, going in to that one week course I felt anxious, unprepared and assumed I wouldn't pass the final exam. The instructor, Brad, and our class TA, Vij, were so incredible the entire week. Brad presented the information in a way that anyone from any walk of life could grasp. He broke down the information in to easily digestible pieces so that we could actually begin to implement what we were learning right away. It wasn't all theory and lecture. He ensured that the class was an interactive learning environment, allowing everyone to take part in the learning, not simply observe. Both Brad and Vij worked patiently with each student to ensure that the information made sense and that no one fell behind. More than once during that week, they bother stayed late to answer questions and to work through problems we might have had. They would constantly offer encouragement when we were struggling and celebrated with us when we succeeded. It seemed obvious that they genuinely cared about our success, not simply our tuition money. I started this journey to create myself a new life full of anxiety and self doubt. After my experience in 102, I am so excited to tackle the challenges that are ahead. If I had tried to simply test in to 201, I might have been able to google my way to a passing grade, but what I received going through Code 102 was so much more than the knowledge to pass an entrance exam. It might seem like a small victory to some, but for me it was huge. It was the first time that I took a proactive step toward a better life instead of just assuming that it wasn't for me. So thankful for Brad and Vij helping me along on the beginning of my learning journey! If you're curious about a career in tech but you're not sure if you are capable then this course is a must.

Comment
    2/11/2020
  • Lee Thomas
  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"An absolute joy"

Code Fellows does an amazing job of making you and you're classmates feel like a team. The pace is fast, but never felt overwhelming, or impossible. The "campus" is very welcoming, with lots of interesting things going on, from dogs running around to... Read More

Comment
    2/10/2020
  • Anthony Cunningham
  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript
  • Graduated: 2019

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"I love code fellows"

I took code 102: Intro to Javascript with Brad smialek as my instructor. I was very nervous and apprehensive about trying to learn a new skill, especially programming. Brad made the entire experience wonderful, entertaining, and highly engaging. 10/10.... Read More

Comment
    2/10/2020
  • william koger
  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Really prepared me"

Attending the 102 course has really helped out when I started 201. Our instructor Brad did a really good job of covering a lot of material in a short week. He created a atmosphere that allowed us to more in depth with questions that may not have been... Read More

Comment
    2/6/2020
  • Fletcher LaRue
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Full-Stack JavaScript - Daytime
  • Graduated: 2019

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"The bootcamp worked for me - (CodeFellows 5 mo on-site program + 5 months hunting = 10 months to job)"

I attended CodeFellows from October 2018 thru March 2019 (5 months), and then spent the following 5 months building my portfolio website, learning in the areas I felt weak in, and looking for a job. In reality I wanted to have a portfolio I was somewhat... Read More

At CodeFellows there are 3 levels, which is nice, because they only bill you at the start of each level (as opposed to the whole lump sum up front), the first 2 levels (201 and 301) are 100% focused on Javascript (no other languages). The 3rd and final level (401) lets you pick which language you want to specialize in (when I attended in 2018/19 the options were: JavaScript, Java, Python, and C#). The last course is the longest and most expensive. I did the JavaScript course, which I would fully recommend. The first two levels (201 and 301) are in Javascript, so switching to a new language part way thru will only prevent you from getting to more complex coding ideas (my personal opinion). Essentially you don't get put back to square 1 in the middle of your learning. I (personal opinion here) think also that JavaScript and the JavaScript curriculum is the most relevant for finding a job for a junior developer. I didn't take the other courses and I don't hire developers so I can't say for sure.

In the JavaScript track you learn a ton of good stuff. And in my job I have used much of it extensively and repeatedly, and often. It was actually kind-of surprising to me how similar to the "project weeks" the actual job was (Code Fellows project weeks are intense 4-day team projects, where you often have to learn and apply stuff you've never done). My formal job duties are as a front-end software developer, which is why I feel the React portion of the course is most applicable and marketable. It is probably the thing that made me most qualified for the job I have now. React might be the single best thing CodeFellows teaches :). In addition, due to the nature of the JavaScript full stack curriculum, I also feel empowered to tackle backend problems. There is a lot of time spent covering things like APIs (when I was there we made Express servers in Node.js), and in my job I've run across both C# and Java APIs and feel right at home because they look similar to the JavaScript APIs we made in class.

We also covered:
- React (the most popular front-end framework out there now)
- React Native using Expo (i.e. use React code to make apps on your phone), some people even published apps on the app store
- Web-sockets (i.e. chat-rooms)
- Authentication (i.e. users can login/logout, and do special things if they're logged in)
- Databases (our class used MongoDB and PostgreSQL) (i.e. users can store and share data that is saved in the cloud. this is data that lasts through a page refresh)
- A ton of other stuff. Call them or find the curriculum for the most up to date info - I know they keep evolving as industry trends change.

I do feel the curriculum was really relevant. This is something that my brother (a pro dev of ~10 years) helped me look at when deciding whether to do a bootcamp, and which bootcamp to do. As part of the vetting process I also met the people, who at CodeFellows are all very nice and supportive --- they do meet-and-greets for prospective students where you can meet current students, alumni, and staff to get a better idea of whether you want to attend and get recommendations -- pretty useful.

If you DO decide to go thru the program, and I would recommend it, since it has changed my life for the better, there are a few things that can really help you succeed in the class, and if at all possible leading up to the program try to situate yourself so that succeeding is as likely as possible.
- prior experience coding (however small)
- "over-achieve" on the prework (khan academy Javascript in particular), try to make challenging goals for yourself once you complete the basic requirements. Try to strive to make something you want to show people! This can make it less of a chore and more of a fun activity. Start this as soon as possible... from this you're pretty much guaranteed to do great at the start of the course.
- mentorship (even 1-2 hours every month), or someone to call and ask questions to or complain to. Find someone, if you can, who knows programming that you can talk to, even if briefly about random stuff. Ideally they can do code reviews.
- short commute. The less time your commute is the longer you'll have to sleep, eat, and code. Ideally you will only be doing those 3 things for the whole program!!

It's not all roses. Going through CodeFellows is not guaranteed to land you a job - your hard work and persistence is what you will need to rely on for that. The program is pretty hard... no single concept is really difficult if enough time is spent on it, but there are new concepts introduced almost every day, and I didn't feel like I had time to master every concept. Do this for 5 months straight and it does take some mental fortitude to get through it. One of the frustrating parts of the course was the grading system. When I went there, it didn't feel like there were enough TAs, so the grading for assignments was often delayed. So I would lose points on some assignment, and then only learned about it later, when my mind is on something else, and/or the grades are getting locked in. When I attended it was a required 90% to pass, but the actual grading was relatively flexible - you could re-submit work that you lost points on to get additional credit (there was a time cut-off for this though, I forget how long, 2 weeks?), and the late-assignment penalty simply reduced the maximum you could get on the assignment, again, I forget how much (80%?), but it wasn't too bad. Often, it felt to me like playing the grade-game was a big distraction from the main objectives of the class - we had ~4 or 5 assignments a day - some were quite trivial like a daily warmup, but others weren't so trivial, like the daily whiteboard problem which takes ~1hr. In the end, I found that (at least for me) the best route was to play the grade-game (i.e, submit assignments even if not-done, play catchup when you can) ONLY as much as needed to get the minimum grade, and not focus on getting 100% .... instead I tried to focus on learning the material. I realized that there was no special award for getting a really good grade, it's just pass fail.

The daily routine can be difficult. But you get out of it what you put in. And its worth it in the end. I spent a lot of time on this stuff... probably ~12 hours a day (including meals). Class started at 9am and with lecture, lab, other homework, the daily whiteboarding problem, catchup work, etc it is easy to go until 9pm. For me, it helped to keep my meals simple, I had a short commute, and I reduced my social life to as minimal as possible. I would also recommend using a Mac laptop instead of a Windows laptop (disclaimer: I am not a Mac evangelist, I had used Microsoft PCs my entire life) the differences are only slight, and people will tell you that you can program on either, but overall, and if you can spare the extra dough, I think the developer experience is better on a Mac, things just seem to work better and smoother. Also, if you finance a Mac with a Barklays card you can get 18 months w/o any payments, at which time you hopefully have a job - this deal might have changed tho. Also I would recommend dropping ~150-200 bucks and buying a 2nd monitor - compared to the price you're paying for the course per day, a monitor to give you some extra screen real-estate is almost a no-brainer - I didn't get one until part way thru the course and when I did my productivity went way up.

One thing that I think had some room for improvement was the job support. The people who were there and helped me did a great job, but as an institution, the process could have, I think, been a little better. It could be different now.... when I had just finished the program there had been some staff changes in the job support program. I'm also not sure what they could have done differently though - I just know it could have been better - possibly better integration with local businesses? i.e. more "practice" (but not really practice) interviews with local companies (I did get to do a mock interview with Microsoft). Maybe setting up informational interviews? tours? On-site job fairs?

Comment
    1/11/2020
  • Coden Quiroz
  • Code 101: Intro to Software Development & Careers in Tech
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Code 101 successful"

overall i learned alot even tho i was brand new into the code world. i really enjoyed how interactive this course was and i really loved my teachers and TAs. I liked that we learned the basics of html but still were able to do things with what we learned.... Read More

Comment
    1/11/2020
  • Zachary Hansen
  • Code 101: Intro to Software Development & Careers in Tech
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Code101"

I appreciated the diversity, safe environment, and overall openness and honesty from the instructors and TA. The class was interactive, fun, and informative. Thanks a lot! Html and css only but with provided lunch. Great environment and coffee near by... Read More

Comment
    1/11/2020
  • Anonymous
  • Code 101: Intro to Software Development & Careers in Tech
  • Graduated: 2020

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Definitely worth a try!"

Code Fellows Code 101 workshop was a great use of my Saturday! I came in unsure if I would be able to keep up or if I would even be interested in learning to code, but I left feeling proud of what I was able to accomplish and interested in learning more... Read More

Comment
    12/2/2019
  • Kris Esvelt
  • Code 501: Intro to Data Structures & Algorithms
  • Graduated: 2019

Overall Score

Curriculum

Job Support

"Great course for reviewing the skills necessary for whiteboard interviews!"

This program teaches how to implement and work with many data-structures including Linked Lists, Trees, Stacks, Queues, Maps, and Graphs as well as some sorting algorithms. Along with this we did practice in whiteboard interviewing, using the topics we... Read More

Comment

Code Fellows's average rating is 4.83 out of 5.0 based on 135 review(s).

Related News

Meet Ron Floyd, US Navy vet and web developer
By: The SwitchUp Team | 6/9/2015
Code Fellows Spotlight Graduate: James Lorence
By: The SwitchUp Team | 12/1/2014

You may also be interested in...

Person thinking

Need help making a decision?

We'll match you to the perfect bootcamp for your location, budget, and future career.